Breakout Sessions

Wednesday, pre-Congress breakout sessions are open to all CNU 21 attendees.

Wednesday | May 29, 2013

Thursday | May 30, 2013

Friday | May 31, 2013

Saturday | June 1, 2013


Engaging the Plat of Zion: A Jam Session

Track:
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 | 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
8 AICP Credits.
Please check back for updates on AIA Credits

Hundreds of New Urbanists. One City Block. Endless Possibilities.

Drop in Wednesday for the NextGen Open Studio. To grapple with Salt Lake City, we will design prototypical blocks and thoroughfares for the Plat of Zion. Rural to urban, ag-urban to sprawl-repair - come tackle a basic urban element, learn from an old tradition, and show your stuff!

Dan Bartman, Senior Planner, City of Somerville, MA

Christopher M. Carrigan, AICP, CNU-A, Associate Architect and Town Designer, Historical Concepts

Paul L. Knight, AICP, CNU-A, Urban Designer and Intern Architect, Historical Concepts


New Urbanism 101

Track: Wednesday Local Session
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 | 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
3 AIA Credits.
Please check back for updates on AICP Credits

This primer on the principles and concepts of New Urbanism will give Congress attendees the opportunity to learn how and why New Urbanism works. The half-day course provides an illustrated introduction and a foundation in key concepts such as conventional vs. traditional development; the Charter; why sustainability matters; and what makes a healthy community. Attend this session and you will walk away with an excellent understanding of the fundamentals of New Urbanism.

Andrés Duany, Principal, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Jeff B. Speck, CNU-A, AICP, LEED AP, Honorary ASLA, Principal, Speck & Associates LLC


Stewardship, Sustainability, and Cities - The Mormon Legacy of Community Building

Track: Wednesday Local Session
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 | 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM
1.33 AICP Credits.
Please check back for updates on AIA Credits

Each community Mormons settled - including Salt Lake City - were designed and built based on adaptations of the “City of Zion” plat. They included many modern features of New Urbanism such as compactness, mixed development, and preservation of appropriate open space. This session will explore the legacy of Mormon town planning and its associative ties to New Urbanism.

Craig D. Galli, Partner, Holland & Hart, LLP


Redefining a Downtown - City Creek Center

Track: Wednesday Local Session
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 | 10:40 AM - 12:00 PM
1.33 AICP Credits.
Please check back for updates on AIA Credits

When City Creek Center was envisioned its goals were to assist in revitalizing downtown Salt Lake City and to help protect the historic LDS Temple and Temple Square. The redevelopment of two and a half city blocks came at a time when the real estate market was suffering terribly, yet the timing wound up being serendipitous to the economic health of Salt Lake City and the region. With City Creek Center now open and operating there is much to now celebrate, reflect on and lessons to be shared. Come and participate in a presentation which will provide you with a fascinating overview of City Creek Center – what the project means to both Salt Lake City and to the LDS Church.

Mark Gibbons, Managing Director, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Bill Williams, Director of Architecture & Design , Special Projects Department, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints


Daybreak - Implementing a Regional Vision at the Local Scale

Track: Wednesday Local Session
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1
AICP CM Credits: 1

Daybreak is the most significant local project spawned by the Envision Utah effort. The 4,200 acre mining site evolved into what is now the Peter Calthorpe master plan and has emerged as a market leading model for sustainable development in the intermountain West. This panel will explore how Rio Tinto / Kennecott Utah Copper came to the decision to develop in support of the new Utah growth vision, how local government was engaged, enabling the community to break dramatically from the conventional development patterns, and how the visioning team gained the confidence that the market would accept such a radical shift in community form and function.

Jon Callender, Ph.D, Consltant, Callender Enterprises

Ricky Horst, City Manager, City of Rocklin, California

Karen Wikstrom, President and Owner, Wikstrom Economic and Planning Consultants, Inc.


Daybreak: Partnering for a Sustainable Future Along the Wasatch Front;
Demystifying community partner needs and planning processes

Track: Wednesday Local Session
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 | 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1
AICP CM Credits: 1

Sustainable development/walkable community conferences often tout public-private partnerships as a panacea for addressing many of the challenges facing communities today. While ventures in this arena make great headlines, actual “in the trench” efforts to effectively cultivate these relationships and capture the associated opportunities can be challenging. At the extremes, underlying distrust often exists between stakeholders while misaligned organizational objectives stifle communication. Add to the mix respective budgetary constraints, independent approval processes and seemingly dissimilar internal/external accountabilities. All of these factors must be addressed, at a minimum considered, as part of collaborative community-building processes. As a work in progress, the Daybreak master plan for a sustainable, walkable community is unfolding through the coordinated efforts of Kennecott Land, South Jordan City, the Jordan School District and several other key community partners. Designed as a panel discussion, this session will provide a candid exploration of lessons learned, opportunities captured and ongoing “partnership” coordination and communication processes.

Rulon Dutson, Manager Community Planning, Kennecott Land

Jon Osier, Senior Engineer - Long Range Planning, Kennecott Utah Copper

Scott M. Thomas, Administrator of Auxiliary Services, Jordan School District

Gary Whatcott, Assistant City Manager, South Jordan City


Daybreak – A Laboratory for Urban Growth in Utah

Track: Wednesday Local Session
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1
AICP CM Credits: 1

Daybreak is the result of its Vision and Implementation processes.

The development team created a strong vision for an adaptable development framework that would transform a mining site into a major urban center. Clear Regional goals aligned road and transit infrastructure with Daybreak’s planned 13 million square feet of commercial uses, 20,000 jobs and 20,000 homes. First principles were set for natural resource conservation; interconnection with adjoining towns and Salt Lake City via transit; diverse, walkable neighborhoods; and the full range of opportunities and amenities that make a city rather than a planned development.

Each year’s Implementation process weaves together diverse inputs such as market research, current needs and conditions, and lessons learned from previous years to refine the vision and guide Daybreak’s growth. Periodic workshops bring together master developer, builders, designers, analysts, and city officials to craft development plans. The voices of other stakeholders, such as HOA’s, interest groups, and religious leaders, are also incorporated into decision-making.

Roger Hodges, Associate Principal, Ken Kay Associates

Ty McCutcheon, Vice President of Community Development, Kennecott Land

Eric Osth, AIA, Principal, Urban Design Associates


A Frontier Forged by Faith – The Impact of Religious Freedom on American Land Use

Track: [Living] Together - Region
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Early settlement patterns on the American frontier often reflected the hopes of religious idealists’ of creating new social structures upon the sparsely inhabited land. Although widely divergent in theology, religious groups were alike in their desire to forge new, faith-based societal frameworks. Early American communities such as Kirtland, Shaker Heights, and Nauvoo are cultural artifacts that reflect the disparate visions of religious groups. Salt Lake City is arguably the most successful, functional community founded on religious ideals based on longevity. Choices were made concerning spatial hierarchies and land distribution that reflected collective values. Because their urban plans controlled settlement patterns, these communities’ faith-based beginnings remain a part of the landscape today. This session will explore a frontier built by faith, and the relationships between people and place.

Joe Alfandre, Developer, The Kentlands Initiative

Philip Bess, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
School of Architecture, University of Notre Dame


Bradford Houston, Manager, Architectural Design: Temple Department, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Eric O. Jacobsen, Reverend, First Presbyterian Church, Tacoma

Natalie C. McCullough, Interfaith Chaplain, The Bradley Center, The Sharing Place, and Good Shepherd Home

Michael Watkins, AIA, AICP, NCARB, LEED AP, CNU-A, Architect, Michael Watkins Architect, LLC


Engaging Full on with Form Based and Smart Code Critics: Good vs. Bad Form Based Codes

Track: [Living] City - Livability
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This panel takes stock of the current status of form-based codes, with particular focus on two of the most fundamental critiques – that they are too controlling and too complex. Does this criticism have merit? Is code reform evolving in a bad direction? What happened to Seaside’s one page code? How can we get back to the original idea of simple codes that allow urbane eccentricity to flourish?

Nick Norris, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division

Daniel Parolek, AIA, Founding Principal, Opticos Design, Inc.

Brenda Scheer, AICP, Dean of the College of Architecture and Planning, University of Utah

Sandy Sorlien, Principal, Smartcode Local

Emily Talen, Ph.D., FAICP, Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University


Open Source Session

Track:
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

The Open Source Congress is the DIY forum that arises annually during the Congress for the New Urbanism. You can use the time and space to talk about new ideas, find help on a thorny problem, or work on a CNU Initiative.

Check the schedule on the Open Source news board or follow updates on Twitter at #cnuopen. Then join a session or create one of your own and let the collaboration begin.


Taxonomy of Urban Façades

Track: [Living] Form - Design
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

When using glass on a building elevation, architects strive to make an abstract skin, devoid of detail, texture, and planar depth. These glass boxes do little to contribute to the urban context. Michael Dennis argues that to make an urban facade some degree of surface is needed, since a planar glass wall is incapable of producing a legible facade. He has been investigating this thesis and will present precedent studies indicating the degree of surface required to make coherent facades within an urban context. Michael is joined by his former student at Cornell, Michael Lykoudis. The Francis and Kathleen Rooney Dean of the School of Architecture, Dean Lykoudis has served as professor of architecture at Notre Dame since 1991. A national and international leader in linking architectural tradition and classicism to urbanism and environmental issues, he has devoted his career to the building, study and promotion of traditional architecture and urbanism.

Michael Dennis, Principal-in-Charge, Michael Dennis and Associates (MDA)

Michael Lykoudis, Francis and Kathleen Rooney Dean of the School of Architecture, University of Notre Dame

Dhiru Thadani, AIA, Principal, Architect + Urbanist


The Great American Grid Debate

Track: Open Innovation
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
1.25 AICP Credits.
Please check back for updates on AIA Credits

Six Urbanists will face off in a Lincoln-Douglas style battle to forever settle the Great Grid Debate. Nowhere in the world is the grid as expansive as the US West. As our cities urbanize we will need more design tools to continue redeveloping and intensifying our still young cities. Both grid loyalists and defectors will share their latest approaches and ideas.

Howard M. Blackson III, Principal, PlaceMakers, LLC

Bill Dennis, Architect & Urban Designer, B. Dennis Town and Building Design

Geoff Dyer, Director of Canadian Operations, PlaceMakers, LLC; Principal and Urban Designer, T-Six Urbanists Inc, Placemakers LLC

Kevin Klinkenberg, AIA, Senior Planner, Olsson Associates

Paul L. Knight, AICP, CNU-A, Urban Designer and Intern Architect, Historical Concepts

Lee Sobel, Real Estate Development and Finance Analyst, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Office of Sustainable Communities


Understanding Institutional Investors and Urban Projects

Track: [Living] Places - Implementation and Finance
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

As financing flocks to urban multifamily development, what are the opportunities for increased investment in the New Urbanism? This panel of equity fund investors and developers will explore what the factors and opportunities will be going forward in the new economy to align the longer value horizon of urbanism with investor expectations, as well as creative ways to structure landowner participation.

Hooper Knowlton III, Partner, Parleys Partners

Graham Larson, Asset Manager & Land Planner , Property Reserve Inc.

W. Don Whyte, President, Elevated Real Estate Solutions LLC


Integrating Our Aging Population into Mixed Use Communities

Track: [Living] City - Livability
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The American population is aging and many communities and homes built over the last several decades are not well suited to “aging in place” or aging with dignity. Planners, developers and architects are rethinking how to accommodate the Baby Boomer generation as they begin to downsize their homes and upsize their civic engagement. Come explore how to meet the demand for affordable housing, as well as social and physical wellbeing in a manner that strengthens our communities.

Mitch Brown, Chief Development Officer, Kisco Senior Living

Jon Dauphine, Senior Vice President, Education and Outreach, AARP

Stephen James, Manager: Planning & Community Design, Kennecott Land

Jerry McDevitt, Principal, Director of Senior Housing, GGLO


Lessons From Envision Utah and Beyond (Envision Utah; Sixteen Years Later)

Track: [Living] Together - Region
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

In 1997, Envision Utah launched its unprecedented effort to engage stakeholders and the public to create a regional vision and strategy for the future. This panel will describe what has been cited as one of the greatest success stories of the smart growth movement: its beginnings, the keys to its success, its impacts, and its implementation.

Dee Allsop, Chairman and CEO, Heart+Mind Strategies

John Fregonese, President, Fregonese Associates, Inc.

Robert J. Grow, President/Chief Executive Officer, Envision Utah

Alan Matheson, Senior Environmental Advisor, State of Utah


Open Source Session

Track:
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

The Open Source Congress is the DIY forum that arises annually during the Congress for the New Urbanism. You can use the time and space to talk about new ideas, find help on a thorny problem, or work on a CNU Initiative.

Check the schedule on the Open Source news board or follow updates on Twitter at #cnuopen. Then join a session or create one of your own and let the collaboration begin.


Street Design: The Art of Complete and Connected Streets

Track: [Living] Systems - Transportation and Infrastructure
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Complete Streets are all the rage; however, Victor Dover and John Massengale argue that only beautiful streets where people want to be are really “complete.” In a heavily-illustrated lecture, using images from cities around the world, Massengale and Dover will show Do’s and Don'ts for good placemaking, and explain why formulaic solutions like bulbouts and hyperstriping can add up to bad urban design. Historic examples and recent retrofits show that good street design can be revolutionary, unlock value, improve life and reknit society.

Victor Dover, CNU-A, Principal, Dover, Kohl & Partners

John Massengale, Principal, Massengale & Co LLC

Marcy McInelly, AIA, President, Urbsworks, Inc


The Western Grid, Applications for the Future

Track: [Living] Form - Design
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The ubiquitous Cartesian grid of most cities in the western US was established over 150 years ago. It has created some great places, and some lousy ones. The Mormon grid in particular has been remarkably influential. What do we do with these places, their virtues and their flaws, as the West continues to populate and demand walkability? How can we work with the grid, change it, and improve it? Or should we do anything at all?

Another approach to the topic is to measure the Mormon grid against differing settlement patterns of the West. An examination of these settlement patterns - as well as conditions such as human comfort, architectural innovations, use of resources, social impacts, etc. - spawns a conversation on the attributes of having a diversity of settlement types, an asset in today’s western cities.

Howard M. Blackson III, Principal, PlaceMakers, LLC

Christopher J. Duerksen, Senior Counsel, Clarion Associates

Kevin Klinkenberg, AIA, Senior Planner, Olsson Associates

Matthew Lambert, Partner, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company


What's Next: Emerging Ideas

Track: Open Innovation
Thursday, May 30, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
1.25 AICP Credits.
Please check back for updates on AIA Credits

Curated by NextGen, this collection of ideas from all aspects of New Urbanism will call attention to emerging ideas in New Urbanism. As Gen X and Gen Y (and soon Gen Z) take on new roles in our society, the changing landscape will create both challenges and opportunities, requiring new techniques and methods to implement the CNU Charter.

Dan Bartman, Senior Planner, City of Somerville, MA

Will Dowdy, Designer, Michael Watkins Architect, LLC


Art Room: The Civic Art of Plan Design

Track: Art Room
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Discover specific physical plan design principles and motifs employed by key urbanists in the design of walkable places through history. Learn how to apply these techniques to the creation of new walkable places today.

James Dougherty, Director of Design, Dover, Kohl & Partners Planning

Galina Tachieva, AICP, Partner, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company


Lessons from Envision Utah and Beyond: Implementing Regional Visions

Track: [Living] Together - Region
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Sixteen years ago, Envision Utah pioneered the “regional visioning” movement, which has spread to many jurisdictions across the country. Today, HUD’s Sustainable Communities grant program is further expanding the regional visioning and implementation movement across the country. Learn implementation lessons from Envision Utah and other efforts.

Mike Allegra, General Manager, Utah Transit Authority

Natalie Gochnour, Chief Economist, Associate Dean, Salt Lake City Chamber, University of Utah

Robert J. Grow, President/Chief Executive Officer, Envision Utah

Andrew S. Gruber, Executive Director, Wasatch Front Regional Council

Shelley R. Poticha, Director, Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities


Live/Work/Walk - Removing Obstacles to Mixed Use Development

Track: [Living] Places - Implementation and Finance
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

CNU and its allied partners have been aggressively pursuing avenues in Washington to make it easier for Developers, Planners, and Architects to create vibrant mixed-use neighborhoods within our cities and towns. Why has this process been so difficult? How can changes at FHA and HUD improve this process dramatically, creating more opportunities for affordable housing and mixed-use development?

Join Developer Katherine Kelley of Jamestown LP, Foundation leader Richard Oram of the Fund for the Environment & Urban Life, and Kurt Roeloffs of Deutsche Bank in an in-depth discussion of impediments and opportunities in smaller scale mixed-use development in our nation’s cities. Steve Maun of LeylandAlliance will moderate this session.

Robert Chapman, Managing Director, Traditional Neighborhood Development Partners LLC

Hana Eskra, Florida Market President, Gorman & Company

Steve J. Maun, Principal, Leyland Alliance

Richard L. Oram, Chairman, Oram Foundation, Inc.

Kurt Roeloffs, Founder, Protean Capital, Former CIO, RREEF Alternative Investments (division of Deutsche Bank)


Mixed-Use Developments: Less Traffic, Better Analysis

Track: [Living] Form - Design
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Current methods of traffic impact analysis are believed to understate the traffic benefits of mixed-use developments (MXDs). A national study for the US EPA developed a new methodology to more accurately predict the traffic impacts of MXDs. Models of internal capture, external walking, and external transit use were estimated using data for six diverse regions, 239 diverse MXDs, and over 35,000 trips to/from/within these MXDs. The models have been validated against vehicle counts at 28 MXDs, and have been shown to outperform the conventional trip generation methodology of the Institute of Transportation Engineers. The new methodology has been adopted for smart growth trip generation analysis by SANDAG, Caltrans, Virginia DOT, and others.

Reid Ewing, Professor, University of Utah - Metropolitan Research Center

Ronald T. Milam, Principal-in-Charge of Technical Development, Fehr & Peers

Stephan Vance, Senior Regional Planner, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG)


Natural Growth Boundaries: The Constraints Created by Air and Water

Track: [Living] Environment - Sustainability
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Every region's water resources have a carrying capacity, from water for drinking to water for yards. The same water must cool our plants, create industries and grow food as well as transport waste, carry recreation and support other species. Similarly, the air of each city can only absorb so much pollution before the city becomes unlivable. The increment of air and water available for humans creates a natural limit to growth. This session will discuss how to build these increments into local land use discussions and how to give proper space for other users of these resources. We will also discuss the strategies for using sustainable urban design to expand the capacity of cities and towns within this increment.

Terry A. Clark, Senior Consultant, Cardno ENTRIX

Gary Lawrence, Vice President
Chief Sustainability Officer, AECOM


Daniel K. Slone, Esquire, Partner, McGuireWoods LLP


Open Source Session

Track:
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 10:45am - 12:00pm
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits


The New Economy of Sharing

Track: Open Innovation
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

How is the evolving "sharing" sector of the economy affecting city life? Into the future, how might it affect city life for better or worse? Participants will discuss everything from car and bike sharing, to office sharing, couch surfing and work-sharing.

Ann B. Daigle, Program Manager, The Prince's Foundation

Eliza Harris, Urban Planner, Canin Associates

Kevin Klinkenberg, AIA, Senior Planner, Olsson Associates

Jennifer Krouse, LEED AP, Founder, Steepletown Studios and Imagining North Adams

Robert Orr, FAIA, LEED, Principal, Robert Orr & Associates LLC

Lee Sobel, Real Estate Development and Finance Analyst, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Office of Sustainable Communities

Dhiru Thadani, AIA, Principal, Architect + Urbanist


Art Room: Travel Sketching and Painting 1 - Classroom Session

Track: Art Room
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
1.25 AIA Credits.
Please check back for updates on AICP Credits

Learn techniques to enhance your powers of observation through on-site sketching, painting and photography. Leading practitioners share their methods for quickly and vividly capturing key forms and details that contribute to the character of a place.

David Csont, Architectural Illustrator, Urban Design Associates

Bill Dennis, Architect & Urban Designer, B. Dennis Town and Building Design

James Dougherty, Director of Design, Dover, Kohl & Partners Planning

Sandy Sorlien, Principal, Smartcode Local


Healthcare in Neighborhoods: Business Practices and Facility Design for Complete Neighborhoods

Track: [Living] Form - Design
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

As the true health impacts of our auto-oriented communities emerge, the relationship between our trusted healthcare institutions and the patterns of development that they follow have significant consequences. This session will explore how innovation in healthcare business practices and integrated facility design can promote a healthier built environment - a complete neighborhood centered on healthcare institutions.

Bob Farrow, AIA, FHFI, LEED AP, Principal and Senior Vice President, Director of Healthcare for the Southeast Region, HKS, Inc.

Walt Massey, National Healthcare Practice Leader, Balfour Beatty Construction

Tom Uriona, Corporate Real Estate Director, Intermountain Heathcare

Douglas Woodruff, Associate, Architectural Nexus


Open Source Session

Track:
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits


Tactical Urbanism: Planning from the Bottom Up

Track: New Urban Research
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 2:00PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Tactical urbanism proposes an alternative understanding of urban design and a change in the culture of planning—from a top-down strategy to a bottom-up tactic. These presentations will focus on three case-studies for the production of non-institutional and temporary urban interventions.

Chuck Bohl, Professor and Director, School of Architecture, University of Miami

Oscar Carracedo, Assistant Professor, National University of Singapore (NUS)

Kimberly C. Driggins, Associate Director of Citywide Planning, District of Columbia Office of Planning (DCOP)

Adolf Sotoca, Associate Professor, UPC_BarcelonaTECH


The Building Blocks From Patterns to Job Creation

Track: Open Innovation
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Build a strong base with a heady brew of Jobs Oriented Development and Workshop Neighborhoods. Pick up practical design tools for neighborhood parks as third places and the form-o-stat for calibrating form-based codes. Stretch your mind with software for thinking; valuing metrics versus instinct; and an open-source, wiki approach to scenario modeling.

Bruce F. Donnelly, Urban Planner, Office of Bruce F. Donnelly

Jennifer Griffin, Designer & Visiting Assistant Research Professor, University of Notre Dame

John Griffin, Designer & Visiting Assistant Research Professor, University of Notre Dame

Nathaniel Hood, Urban/Transportation Planner, Streets.MN

Michael E. Huston, Arch., LEED AP, Architect / Urban Designer, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Jennifer Krouse, LEED AP, Founder, Steepletown Studios and Imagining North Adams

Bill Lennertz, Executive Director, National Charrette Institute

Michael Mehaffy, Executive Director, Sustasis Foundation

Robert Orr, FAIA, LEED, Principal, Robert Orr & Associates LLC


Today's Best Form-Based Codes

Track:
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 3
AICP CM Credits: 15

Plans importantly state intent, but codes require the results intended. The practice of Form-Based Coding has evolved based on lessons learned over the years and the increasing number of use applications for FBC. Initially used for private developers or communities developing greenfield locations, FBCs are now applied in myriad circumstances i.e. repair of under-performing corridors or downtowns, for small historic neighborhoods or large regions undergoing transitions. Today’s Best Form-Based Codes will explore several codes selected by the Driehaus Form-Based Codes Awards 2013 Jury as codes that exemplify the best in current FBC practice. We will learn why these codes were selected by the jury, will hear from code representatives about the challenges they surmounted, and session attendees will have the opportunity to discuss the codes with the presenters. This in-depth session is one where we all learn from one another so bring your knowledge and experience to the discussion!

Erik J. Aulestia, AICP, Principal, Torti Gallas and Partners, Inc.

Geoffrey Ferrell, Principal, Ferrell Madden Associates LLC

Susan Henderson, AIA, LEED AP, CNU-A, Principal, PlaceMakers LLC

Robert Sitkowski, Real Estate Officer, University of Connecticut


Lisa Wise, AICP, President, Lisa Wise Consulting, Inc.


Urban Freeway Removal: How Do We Win This Fight in More Places?

Track: [Living] Systems - Transportation and Infrastructure
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Transitioning from a technical case study to a broader national perspective, this session will trace the historical and political narrative of urban freeway removal. It will explore the role of political will and leadership as the impetus to remove freeways from the urban fabric. Panelists will discuss how to move people to action and create necessary policy shift.

Caitlin Ghoshal, Program and Development Manager, Congress for the New Urbanism

Ian Lockwood, P.E., Livable Transportation Engineer, AECOM

Aaron Naparstek, Founder and Editor in Chief, Streetsblog

Peter Park, Adjunct Faculty, University of Colorado-Denver


Urbanism and the Land

Track: [Living] Environment - Sustainability
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

All development is located in places originally created by natural systems, some of which we often value (waterfronts) and some of which we have historically damaged or destroyed (wetlands). How can we develop properly from the start? Without going back to pre-settlement, how can we successfully redo what we've harmed?

What are biophilic cities? How do they balance natural systems and development? How do they design with natural systems in mind? We'll see examples from near and far.

Laura Hanson, Executive Director, Jordan River Commission

Dan Leftwich, Attorney & Founder, MindDrive Legal Services, LLC

Susan Mudd, Environmental Consultant, Environmental Law & Policy Center


Art Room: Travel Sketching and Painting 2 - Practice in the Field

Track: Art Room
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
1.25 AIA Credits.
Please check back for updates on AICP Credits

The best way to learn is by doing! Grab your sketch pad, brushes, camera and other graphic tools of choice as we head outside for a quick guided session to practice sketching, painting and photography in the field. Leading practitioners will provide helpful tips and demonstrations of techniques.

David Csont, Architectural Illustrator, Urban Design Associates

Bill Dennis, Architect & Urban Designer, B. Dennis Town and Building Design

James Dougherty, Director of Design, Dover, Kohl & Partners Planning

Sandy Sorlien, Principal, Smartcode Local


Missing Middle Housing: Responding to the Growing Demand for Walkable Urban Living

Track: [Living] Form - Design
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The mismatch between the current housing stock in the U.S. and the large demographic shift, combined with the growing market demand for walkalble urban living, has been poignantly defined by recent research and publications by the likes of Christopher Nelson and Chris Leinberger and most recently, by the Urban Land Institute’s publication, “What’s Next: Real Estate in the New Economy.” Missing Middle housing types such as duplexes, fourplexes, bungalow courts, mansion apartments, and live-work units are a critical part of the solution of meeting this demand and should be a part of every architect’s, planner’s, and developer’s arsenal.

This session will explore the characteristics of Missing Middle housing from a design, development, and coding perspective, assess case studies from the Salt Lake City region and across the country, and investigate building code, zoning, Fair Housing Act, and financing obstacles in place for these types.

Rene Oehlerking, Marketing Director, Garbett Homes

Daniel Parolek, AIA, Founding Principal, Opticos Design, Inc.

Linda Pruitt, President, The Cottage Company


Open Source Session

Track:
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits


Placemaking through Community Engagement and Civic Retail;
Implementing Public Markets, Farmers Markets, Town Centers and Evening Markets

Track: [Living] Places - Implementation and Finance
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Placemaking is seen by some as the new environmentalism, wherein integrated planning and design are utilized to create liveable, walkable, workable, and loveable environments that are accessible and inclusive. Public markets have experienced a revival with the continued strong interest in agriculture and a sustainable local economy. Public markets are becoming pillars of civic life and community. Even smaller farmer's markets have exploded onto the scene and can produce significant positive impacts with minimal capital investment. Community engagement can put the magic, power, and inspiration back into our urban design processes through new place management and governance models. This presentation will examine the re-emergence of public markets, big and small, throughout North America and Australia, and review best practices to integrate these concepts into existing city centers and rural environments. Emphasis will be placed on community engagement, place activation, implementation, financial structure, and the rituals of civic life.

Gilbert Rochecouste , Founder & Managing Director, Village Well

Robert Sharp, Principal, Robert Sharp Architect, Inc., Partners for Better Housing

Rob Spanier, Partner & Principal, LiveWorkLearnPlay


Power to the People and People in the Streets

Track: Open Innovation
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
1.25 AICP Credits.
Please check back for updates on AIA Credits

Could your town use a CNU Chapter charrette? Does your community street feel like a highway? Are you ready to bring CNU to the people with Walkable Civic Power? Want to plan a regional thoroughfare network or a pedestrian zone? Come learn about community building and mobility, ideas that form resilient, engaged communities.

Kai Bates, Graduate Student, Master of Community and Regional Planning, University of Oregon

Andy Boenau, AICP, Transportation Raconteur, Timmons Group

Stephen Coyle, AIA, LEEP-AP, Owner, Town-Green

Katherine Gregor, Staff Writer, Austin Chronicle

Heather Smith, Planning Director, Congress for the New Urbanism

Bill Spikowski, FAICP, Principal, Spikowski Planning Associates


Tactical (New) Urbanism

Track: [Living] City - Livability
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Tactical urbanism, loosely defined as inexpensive, individual projects that make small places more lively and enjoyable, are growing in popularity. Whether done by individuals, local organizations or fostered by local governments, tactical urbanism is engaging people and grasping the attention of decision-makers across the country. How is tactical urbanism changing the way people view public spaces and what does it mean for New Urbanism?

Nan Ellin, Professor and Chair of the Department of City & Metropolitan Planning, University of Utah

Andrew Howard, AICP, Civic Entrepreneur, Team Better Block

Mike Lydon, Principal, The Street Plans Collaborative

Aaron Naparstek, Founder and Editor in Chief, Streetsblog


The Language of Complete Streets

Track: [Living] Systems - Transportation and Infrastructure
Friday, May 31, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

With varying definitions attributed to a multitude of value systems, language can have a significant effect on how people describe ideas and solutions for streets, and how professionals and the public perceive acceptability. This session explores the language associated with Complete Streets and related initiatives that create livable and walkable streets. The session will cover the movement’s history, including the original intent of Complete Streets. A special emphasis will be on case studies in which language had an effect on street design and community perception. Participants in this session will be challenged to assess how language and terminology may bias or shape outcomes in their own communities. The session will also include practical information on redesigning streets for livability,pulling from a diversity of case studies, both successful and less-than-successful. The session will discuss the challenges of simultaneously dealing with public perception, transportation equity, safety, and economic development, while keeping a consistent message.

Annick C. Beaudet, AICP, Neighborhood Connectivity Division, City of Austin

Robin Hutcheson, Transportation Director, Salt Lake City

Ian Lockwood, P.E., Livable Transportation Engineer, AECOM

Jon Nepstad, AICP, Principal, Fehr & Peers - Salt Lake Office


Agrarian Urbanism and the Mormon Block

Track: [Living] Environment - Sustainability
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The Mormon Block is a unique seedbed for Agrarian Urbanism by design: from the beginning, it was meant to be large enough to allow agriculture in the middle. Farmers markets, community gardens, and home gardening have all been around for a long time, but still, the overwhelming majority of food consumed in cities travels great distances to get there. Is it possible that the Mormon Block, because of its size, might become an ideal model of Agrarian Urbanism that informs finer-grained urbanism and breaks the stranglehold industrial agriculture holds on our food supply? This session explores the design, marketing, economic, and social factors that could allow this to happen.

Sharon Leopardi, Founder, BUG Farms

Steve A. Mouzon, AIA, LEED, Principal, The New Urban Guild

Ashley Patterson, Executive Director, Wasatch Community Gardens


Art Room: Rendering in Pen and Ink

Track: Art Room
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Effective line drawing is fundamental to the delineation of architecture and urbanism. You’ll learn a classic, easy-to-follow line drawing process combining the study of architectural proportions with time-tested pen and ink drawing techniques.

David Csont, Architectural Illustrator, Urban Design Associates


Breaking Down Barriers and Getting it Built

Track: Open Innovation
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25

This is where the dollars hit the concrete. Discover the potential of Community-Based Real Estate Investment and crash silos as an artisan urbanist. Learn what software entrepreneurs can tell us about how to craft places. Lay the groundwork by breaking down regulatory barriers, championing sound fiscal policy and learning to build without subsidies.

R. John Anderson, Principal, Anderson Kim Architecture + Urban Design

Nathaniel Hood, Urban/Transportation Planner, Streets.MN

Jennifer Krouse, LEED AP, Founder, Steepletown Studios and Imagining North Adams

Benjamin Miller, Real Estate Developer, Fundrise

John O. Norquist, President and CEO, Congress for the New Urbanism

Brandon A. Palanker, Vice President of Marketing & Public Affairs, Renaissance Downtowns

Peter Scholz, Certified Community and Regional Planner, Cairnstone Land Use Planning & Project Management

Padriac Steinschneider, President, Gotham Design & Community Development Ltd

Neil Takemoto, Managing Partner, CSPM Group


Citizen Interventions and the Changing Urban Landscape

Track: [Living] Form - Design
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

People are demanding change in their environment. More and more we see citizens changing the urban landscape through direct interventions. These "citizen interventions" are all based on the idea that one person, or a group of people, can generate change in their surroundings. Design competitions reach out to a global audience with the intent it will be applied in a hyper local way, crowd-sourcing is harnessing city-wide input with the purpose it will impact a very specific neighborhood or project, while on the most micro level tactical urbanist responses are emanating from people looking to make immediate transformations to their surroundings. While these "citizen interventions" represent a change in planning culture, how long lasting are these practices, will it speed the process of transforming many of our cities into the livable places of which we dream, and what are the policy implications for municipalities?

Michael Larice, Associate Professor, City & Metropolitan Planning, University of Utah

Molly Robinson, AICP, Urban Designer, Salt Lake City Planning Division

Greg Walker, Project Coordinator, VCBO Architecture


Open Source Session

Track:
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 10:45am - 12:00pm
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits


Sustaining Rail and Other Infrastructure Through Innovation

Track: [Living] Places - Implementation and Finance
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

How can rail transit and civic projects secure sufficient financing in an era of reduced federal and state funding? What will it take to attract more private investment? Several examples will be explored including: the Cotton Belt project in DFW, Utah Transit’s innovative approach to federal partnerships, and jump-starting a streetcar system in El Paso.

Mathew McElroy, AICP, CNU-A, Deputy Director, Planning & Economic Development, City of El Paso, TX

Scott Polikov, President, Vialta Group, A Gateway Planning Company

Matt Sibul, Chief Planning Officer, Utah Transit Authority


Technology in Transportation

Track: [Living] Systems - Transportation and Infrastructure
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Demographic shifts and advances in technology are shaping the future of transportation systems and our relationship to these systems. As the baby boomer generation ages, many are seeking a lifestyle with less reliance on automobiles. Generation Y also appears to value driving differently than previous generations. With increasingly more options to choose from and access to information at our fingertips, how users interact with the transportation system is drastically altering. This session will explore the impact of these changes, how new technology can better meet user expectations, and how these technology can assist with planning transportation systems into the future.

Ronald T. Milam, Principal-in-Charge of Technical Development, Fehr & Peers

Joseph Schwieterman, Director, Chaddick Institute-Metropolitan Dev. at DePaul University


Urbanism in China: A New Scale of Endeavor

Track: [Living] Form - Design
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

CNU is proud to welcome urban designer Leon Huang of HHDesign International, in Tianjin. Mr. Huang’s remarkable practice harnesses the explosive growth of Chinese cities to produce works combining ecological considerations, transit, historic preservation, and great formal sophistication in the making of urban places. Few in the West have grappled with the immensity and suddenness of these urban transformations.
CNU co-founder Daniel Solomon will introduce Mr. Huang and set the stage for discussion. Vinayak Bharne of Moule/Polyziodes will present the outline of his recent book The Emerging Asian City: Concomitant Urbanities & Urbanisms and join Daniel Solomon, Dhiru Thadani and Leon Huang in conversation.

Vinayak Bharne, Director of Design, Moule & Polyzoides Architects and Urbanists

Leon Huang, Principal, Huahui Design

Daniel Solomon, Principal, Mithun | Solomon


Art Room: Architectural Design Techniques for Charrettes

Track: Art Room
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Charrettes are fast-paced and full of action. Learn reliable techniques and an efficient workflow for designing beautiful architectural plans and elevations within a high-energy, collaborative charrette environment.

Steve A. Mouzon, AIA, LEED, Principal, The New Urban Guild


Codes, Retrofits and Walkability from Salt Lake City to West Africa

Track: Open Innovation
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25

The best in design techniques and perspectives will be on display - from courtyard apartments under Miami 21 to retrofitted regional suburban centers accessed by transit. Stretch beyond density with Walkability 2.0. Implement form-based codes in Salt Lake City and West Equatorial Africa and find out the (almost) panacea of sprawl retrofit.

Stephen Coyle, AIA, LEEP-AP, Owner, Town-Green

William de St. Aubin, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, Sizemore Group

Hank Dittmar, Chief Executive, The Prince's Foundation

James Dougherty, Director of Design, Dover, Kohl & Partners Planning

Leslie Oberholtzer, Principal and Director of Planning, Farr Associates Architecture & Urban Design

Daniel Parolek, AIA, Founding Principal, Opticos Design, Inc.

Robert Sharp, Principal, Robert Sharp Architect, Inc., Partners for Better Housing

Galina Tachieva, AICP, Partner, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company


Complete Networks: Bicycles, Pedestrians, and Transit Users

Track: [Living] Systems - Transportation and Infrastructure
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will discuss a variety of planning strategies that can be employed to create regional non-motorized connectivity: including infrastructure investment, providing transit connections, bike sharing, etc. This session will describe regional efforts currently underway to connect bicycles and pedestrians to existing transit networks. This will include discussions regarding: innovative bike-ped inventory and connectivity measurement techniques, analysis and evaluations of non-motorized travel behavior, and techniques to calculate the economic impacts of bike-ped infrastructure. The session will also address the new downtown Salt Lake City bike share program and how it is providing micro-scale connectivity to transit. Additionally, the session will highlight the "Utah Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan Design Guide" and how it has been used to help small communities plan for non-motorized modes. This guidebook was awarded the 2012 "Best Project Award" by the U.S. Institute of Transportation Engineers, Bicycle and Pedestrian Council.

Ben Bolte, Director, GREENbike (SLC Bike Share)

Shaunna K. Burbidge, President, Active Planning

Hal R. Johnson, AICP, Manager of Project Development, Utah Transit Authority

Maria Vyas, AICP, Senior Transportation Planner, Fehr and Peers


Green Infrastructure: Conservation, Engineering and Vision

Track: [Living] Environment - Sustainability
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The term Green Infrastructure can refer to a range of urban features that weave nature into the fabric of a city. On one end of the range, it promotes a connected network of green spaces including parks and conserved natural areas; on the other, ecologically engineered features that are living or more natural versions of traditional “grey” infrastructure. By embracing its broadest definition, green infrastructure has unparalleled potential to meet multiple objectives and serve multiple functions within an urban area. Frequently, these functions coincide as much by happy coincidence as by design, as cities take advantage of opportunities as they arise. This session brings together researchers and practitioners who approach green infrastructure from very different perspectives, to imagine the full potential of green infrastructure, a combination of conservation, design and community vision, and to chart a way forward in turning the concept into implementation.

Jonathan Bowers, Project Civil Engineer, Psomas

Tom Jacobs, Environmental Program Director, Mid-America Regional Council

Christine Pomeroy, P.E., Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Utah

Sumner M. Swaner, Land Architect, Ecological Planning Center


Open Source Session

Track:
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits


Tactical Urbanism: Methods and Practices

Track: New Urban Research
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Tactical urbanism offers temporary revisions to the configuration of undervalued urban spaces. This session will focus on bottom-up tactics, everyday life interventions, methodologies, and informal projects delivering structural environmental changes of long term significance.

Danielle Dai, Master of City Planning Student, University of California, Berkeley

Andrew L. Duvall, Asst. Research Professor, Department of Health and Behavioral Sciences, University of Colorado, Denver

Deborah S. Main, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Health and Behavioral Sciences, University of Colorado, Denver

Wesley E. Marshall, Ph.D., P.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado Denver

Michael Mehaffy, Executive Director, Sustasis Foundation

Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Principal, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company


The Granary District: Crowd-Sourcing the Evolution of an Industrial Neighborhood

Track: [Living] City - Livability
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Before the sub-dividing of America, neighborhoods were the natural result of people gathering to work, to play, and to live. In the age of the automobile, we've strayed a bit from this vision. But a rising generation seeks a new way of living. Millennials want a place where life, work, and the pursuit of happiness are combined in a renewed and sustainable way.

Yet you can't ever really go back. The days of neighborhoods springing organically from the soil are over. But there's a new way to bring people together —neighbors, prospective tenants, investors, and the development community. It's called crowd-sourcing.

James Alfandre, Executive Director, The Kentlands Initiative

Kevin Blalock, AIA, Founder, Blalock & Partners Architectural Design Studio

Luke Garrott, Council Member, Salt Lake City Council

Michael Watkins, AIA, AICP, NCARB, LEED AP, CNU-A, Architect, Michael Watkins Architect, LLC


Art Room: SketchUp as a Foundation for Quick Charrette Hand Drawing

Track: Art Room
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Are you interested in learning how to produce quick charrette renderings? First, you’ll learn how to build a quick 3D model in SketchUp to use as a drawing base, Then, we’ll concentrate on accelerated charrette hand drawing overlay techniques. We’ll conclude with Photoshop steps to quickly give your drawing a final polish.

James Dougherty, Director of Design, Dover, Kohl & Partners Planning

Jason King, AICP, CNU-A, Project Director, Dover, Kohl & Partners


Digital Technologies That Help Build Communities

Track: [Living] Together - Region
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Digital technology is changing the way people interact with their surroundings. Far from "Disconnecting Urbanism," the mixed mediums of the digital age - the smartphone, tablet computer, social media, the app are encouraging people to connect, collaborate and communicate across digital networks that serve the same traditional functions of the street. As evidenced by the demographic desire for compact, connected, urban places, digital technologies are helping build communities. This session will examine the overlap between digital and real-life networks, the effect of digital engagement on planning and development, and what the confluence of the digital and physical may mean for the future of our cities.

Brandon A. Palanker, Vice President of Marketing & Public Affairs, Renaissance Downtowns

Robert Vogel, CEO, Peak Democracy, Inc.

Nole Walkingshaw, Planning Programs Supervisor, Salt Lake City Planning Division


Open Source Session

Track:
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits


Reshaping Metropolitan America

Track: [Living] City - Livability
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Dr. Arthur C. Nelson will reflect on where our real estate markets were, are now, and headed into the future. He will show how economic, demographic, and preference changes will reshape the housing market and along the way reshape metropolitan areas. Dr. Nelson's analysis will include the role of nonresidential development and redevelopment in reshaping America's metropolitan areas.

Arthur C. Nelson, Director of Metropolitan Research
Department of City and Metropolitan Planning
College of Architecture + Planning, University of Utah


Subsidiarity and Radical Trust from Main Street to Lake Belt Cities

Track: Open Innovation
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

New approaches to governance and urbanism are critical to resilience of small communities and cities. From a proposed Office of Civic Investment, Informed Observations and Radical Trust to the expression of subsidiarity through "Tactical Urbanism," "Slow Urbanism," and "Incremental Urbanism" to sustainably re-positioning the Lake Belt; new economy strategies reformulate the distribution of control over urban structure devolving more responsibility to the local level.

Demetri Baches, Managing Partner, Metrocology Inc.

Howard M. Blackson III, Principal, PlaceMakers, LLC

Paul Crabtree, P.E., President, Crabtree Group, Inc.

Bruce F. Donnelly, Urban Planner, Office of Bruce F. Donnelly

Edward Erfurt, Urban Designer, Martin County Community Redevelopment Agency

Mike Lydon, Principal, The Street Plans Collaborative

Charles Marohn, Jr., P.E., AICP, Executive Director, Strong Towns

Michael Mehaffy, Executive Director, Sustasis Foundation

Mark Nickita, President, Archive Design Studio


Transit Oriented Development: An Integrated Incremental Approach

Track: [Living] Systems - Transportation and Infrastructure
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Great urban places are inherently transit-supportive, but does the best urbanism happen by accident? Although scientific support lags, there is a strong connection between the CNU’s support of great urban design and the best practices for Transit Oriented Development (TOD). The key is to identify local opportunities for the integration of critical urban issues in anticipation of TOD, such as parking management, land use regulation, multi-modal transportation, and economic development programs. Panel members at this session will detail current projects that demonstrate how good urbanism and TOD can be aligned and intentional. This is a TOD session demonstrating how grassroots advocacy and tactical urbanism, local business cooperation, and government strategies are working hand-in-hand to support transit investment. See how these approaches are playing out in different cities that have different personalities, from Tucson and the Modern Streetcar; to Austin, Texas; to Portland Oregon; and how the CNU Project for Transportation Reform has helped push many of these ideas forward.

Donovan Durband, ParkWise Program Administrator, City of Tucson, Arizona

Marcy McInelly, AIA, President, Urbsworks, Inc

Chris Riley, City Council Member, City of Austin, Texas

Emily Yetman, MLA, Executive Director, Living Streets Alliance, Tucson, Arizona


Urbanism and Affordability

Track:
Saturday, June 1, 2013 | 3:45 PM - 5:00PM
1.5 AICP Credits.
Please check back for updates on AIA Credits

San Francisco affordable housing hero and architect of the 2012 ULI Global Award for excellence, David Baker, will join Scott Bernstein, President of CNT, and Ellen Dunham-Jones for a discussion of the achieving affordable living in good urban places. What are the obstacles to better linkage of affordable housing and affordable transportation and how can CNU initiatives effect this challenge?

David Baker, FAIA, Architect, David Baker Architects

Scott Bernstein, President, Center for Neighborhood Technology

Ellen Dunham-Jones, Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, Georgia Institute of Technology